Easy Morse Code DeCoding chart

by davenathanson on April 4, 2011

in CommunicationsTech,ham radio

It is easy to find a chart that shows the translation from alphabet to Morse code. And those are easy to use when you want to EnCode or translate words into Morse code. The regular chart is optimized for translation in this direction because it is sorted alphabetically.

But what happens when you want to translate Morse code into alphabet? That is difficult with the usual Morse Code table because it is not sorted by dots and dashes. You have to hunt through the whole alphabet to find the matching Morse code.

Here is a novel approach to DeCoding Morse. Start with your finger at “Start Here”. Then move your finger to track the Morse dots & dashes. You will arrive at the correct letter! Try it!

You may download nice clean PDF all ready to print. The chart without numbers (as shown above) is simpler to look at and easier to use if you don’t need to decode numbers. I hope you find this useful, or at least amusing.

Download Morse DeCode Chart, A-Z (without numbers, as shown above)

Download Morse DeCode Chart complete with A-Z and Numbers (I left off the punctuation & symbols for simplicity).

 

INTERNATIONAL MORSE CODE
A ·­ N ­· 1 ·­­­­
B ­··· O ­­­ 2 ··­­­
C ­·­· P ·­­· 3 ···­­
D ­·· Q ­­·­ 4 ····­
E · R ·­· 5 ·····
F ··­· S ··· 6 ­····
G ­­· T ­ 7 ­­···
H ···· U ··­ 8 ­­­··
I ·· V ···­ 9 ­­­­·
J ·­­­ W ·­­ 0 ­­­­­
K ­·­ X ­··­
L ·­·· Y ­·­­
M ­­ Z ­­··

{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Danny May 6, 2011 at 8:54 am

I am sure someone has pointed out that the decoder chart for 9 seems to be wrong for if you trace it out it shows 5 dah’s and 1 dit. The chart above shows 4 dah’s and 1 dit for 9. Maybe the chart line for 9 needs to be moved between the 4th and 5th dah. Every thing else on the chart seems to be good.

davenathanson May 6, 2011 at 9:28 am

Hi Danny, you have a sharp eye, and you are the first person to point this out! Awesome! Thanks for the help, I’ve corrected the #9 on the chart as you suggested.

Stephen Carter June 14, 2011 at 7:39 am

Excellent Chart! Since I started learning Morse Code recently for the Radio Monday’s group, I’ve wanted something like this.
Thanks for making it available.
Carter

James June 20, 2012 at 1:12 am

Hi Dave,

I stumbled upon your site and found your morse code tree. I love the layout! I had a question – the tree I was introduced to was the standard ‘dits’ to the right, and ‘dahs’ to the left. I like the layout of your tree much better though, and was curious if you still had the original layout file, or could reverse the layout so the dits go to right and dahs to left? I’d love to get it from you if you’d be so kind!

Thanks,

James

davenathanson June 20, 2012 at 8:17 am

Hi James, I do have the original file. I did it in a Mac drawing application called Intaglio. If that is something you can open, I’m happy to share the file with you. Hmmm, it might be possible to reverse the whole drawing without a lot of trouble.

Ricardo February 25, 2014 at 9:21 am

Awesome chart!
I has been looking for this since I saw it in a coin, and besides you, I have only found it in a course of Physics of ham radio from the rice university ham club.
I am not sure which is easier to use, this or the morse code “tree”, but this is definitely my favorite for looks.
My only pick would be that IMHO the letter F would be better put to the left in both charts, just for the sake of a sense of simmetry.

Allyson March 29, 2014 at 9:06 am

Your chart is wonderful! I’m a music professor (composition), and am quite accustomed to graphics that represent sounds, so this sort of graphic is right up my alley, and will help me immensely. I’m also a ham, General class, planning on going for Extra soon. I’m new enough to the whole thing that I haven’t had to pass a code test, and won’t for Extra. But this morning, I read of the death of Admiral/Senator Jeremiah Denton, who’d blinked Code to convey a message when he was a POW. I’ve decided to learn Code to honor him, and to honor my dad, a violist whom the Army assigned to radio duties in WW II because they knew a musician would pick up Code quickly. And while I’m at it, I’ll honor Commander Lloyd Bucher, who simply spoke a coded message via a homophone.

Thank you very much! 73

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